Going to the Cloud? Avoid these Mistakes

Bill Kleyman

“Cloud computing is a powerful, agile model that can positively impact pretty much any business out there. As long as it’s deployed properly, that is. This means good planning, a solid infrastructure, and a use-case which directly fits what the cloud can deliver.
In reality, almost all organizations using the Internet are utilizing some element of cloud computing. The differentiator is the extent and which model of the cloud is being deployed. In fact, global spending on IaaS is expected to reach almost $16.5 billion in 2015, an increase of 32.8 percent from 2014, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2014 to 2019 forecast at 29.1 percent, according to Gartner’s latest forecast. The report notes that over time, many businesses, especially in the midmarket, will eventually migrate away from running their own data centers in favor of relying primarily on infrastructure in the cloud.”

10 Tips for Selecting the Right IP Transit Provider to Help You Battle the Internet Traffic Surge

Mike Leber

“Industry analysts’ predictions concerning global Internet Protocol (IP) traffic are staggering. According to Cisco, annual global IP traffic will pass the zettabyte threshold by the end of 2016 and will reach two zettabytes per year by 2019. Furthermore, global IP traffic, which has increased fivefold over the past five years, is projected to increase threefold over the next five years. Perhaps even more impressive is traffic from wireless and mobile devices, which will exceed wired device traffic by next year, and that the number of devices connected to IP networks will be more than three times the global population by 2019.

Carriers, cable companies and businesses that depend on the Internet must keep pace with this rapid increase of traffic in order to effectively serve their customers today and into the future — but how can they guarantee they’re doing so as effectively as possible?”

Microsoft Moves Toward Open Source as Linux Fills Its Cloud

Cade Metz

“In a perfect world, says Microsoft’s Mark Russinovich, everyone would run Windows. But he’s playing for laughs.

Sure, Russinovich wants people to run Windows. As a Microsoft Fellow, he helped build the company’s flagship computer operating system. But like the rest of the rapidly evolving Microsoft, he also realizes that so much of the world now runs Linux, the Windows alternative built by a vast community of open source software coders. In fact, Russinovich says, Linux now drives about 25 percent of the activity on Azure, the Microsoft cloud computing service where businesses can run websites and other software applications without setting up their own computer servers. That’s up from 20 percent in the fall.”

Dropbox Beefs Up Security With USB Keys

Chloe Albanesius

“Dropbox rolled out two-factor authentication in 2012, (shortly after it was hit by a spam attack carried out by stolen passwords). It provides people with an extra layer of protection by requiring a second form of authentication. Typically, people will have a six-digit code sent to their mobile phones after entering their normal password. So if your password is stolen, the hackers will not be able to gain access to your account unless they also have your phone, or whatever secondary form of authentication you’ve selected.”

Your Samsung phone comes close to replacing your wallet

Hope King

“The misshapen leather. That faded magnetic stripe.

Samsung wants to make these physical payment problems a thing of the past with Samsung Pay — and it may have better luck than other companies trying to do the same.

That’s because Samsung Pay will work almost everywhere.

The South Korean electronics titan is launching its own pay-using-your-phone product later this month in Korea, and on September 28 in the United States.

Samsung Pay will work not only with tap-to-pay Near Field Communication readers, but also plain old magnetic stripe card readers.”